Playmixt= playlist+mix tape

RSS

Posts tagged with "Genesis"

Oct 1

On a day like today, you could probably use a little Peter Gabriel-era Genesis. Here’s Watcher of the Skies.

kelliope:

Genesis - Watcher of the Skies  1973 The Midnight Special

The Midnight Special, Holls.  The Midnight SPECIAL

Jun 9
MYSTERY SOLVED: Ever wanted to know just what the hell movie Mike + the Mechanics’ tune Silent Running (On Dangerous Ground) is from? The sleeve of the single lists it as TITLE TRACK FROM THE MOVIE “ON DANGEROUS GROUND,” a film which never seemed to come out in America. There is, however, an old Nicholas Ray movie with that title.
For those of us in North America, said film was retitled to CHOKE CANYON. Here is its IMDB entry.  You can see a trailer for it here.
How bad can it be? Lance Henriksen is in it, you guys. And in a suit!
And since you know you wanna hear it now, here you go:http://grooveshark.com/s/Silent+Running/34MTzZ?src=5

MYSTERY SOLVED: Ever wanted to know just what the hell movie Mike + the Mechanics’ tune Silent Running (On Dangerous Ground) is from? The sleeve of the single lists it as TITLE TRACK FROM THE MOVIE “ON DANGEROUS GROUND,” a film which never seemed to come out in America. There is, however, an old Nicholas Ray movie with that title.

For those of us in North America, said film was retitled to CHOKE CANYON. Here is its IMDB entry.  You can see a trailer for it here.

How bad can it be? Lance Henriksen is in it, you guys. And in a suit!

And since you know you wanna hear it now, here you go:
http://grooveshark.com/s/Silent+Running/34MTzZ?src=5

Jul 6
Great posting today over at Aquarium Drunkard regarding Peter Gabriel’s swan song with Genesis, The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway.  Click on the photo to read it.
Additionally, if you’re a fan of that period of Genesis, you should be aware of a tribute band based out of Montreal called THE MUSICAL BOX.  Starting in October, TMB are touring LAMB, which includes re-creating all the original instrumentation, staging, lights, costumes, slideshow, etc.  When they first did this about 12 years ago, Genesis not only licensed them to do so, but loaned TMB the slides from the original tour. 
Absent a time machine to go back and see Peter Gabriel fronting this amazing show, I highly endorse The Musical Box.
Odd side note: while traveling to Toronto once to see them perform circa the late 1990s, the Canadian border guard asked me the “Business or Pleasure?” question and I relayed that my reason was for a concert.
"What concert?" "The Musical Box."  "How did you (meaning someone from Pittsburgh per my ID) find out about The Musical Box?!”"The internet!" 
He made me give him my email address in order to trade bootlegs (!) but alas, he never wrote. 

Great posting today over at Aquarium Drunkard regarding Peter Gabriel’s swan song with Genesis, The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway.  Click on the photo to read it.

Additionally, if you’re a fan of that period of Genesis, you should be aware of a tribute band based out of Montreal called THE MUSICAL BOX.  Starting in October, TMB are touring LAMB, which includes re-creating all the original instrumentation, staging, lights, costumes, slideshow, etc.  When they first did this about 12 years ago, Genesis not only licensed them to do so, but loaned TMB the slides from the original tour. 

Absent a time machine to go back and see Peter Gabriel fronting this amazing show, I highly endorse The Musical Box.

Odd side note: while traveling to Toronto once to see them perform circa the late 1990s, the Canadian border guard asked me the “Business or Pleasure?” question and I relayed that my reason was for a concert.

"What concert?"
"The Musical Box." 
"How did you (meaning someone from Pittsburgh per my ID) find out about The Musical Box?!”
"The internet!" 

He made me give him my email address in order to trade bootlegs (!) but alas, he never wrote. 

May 4
NPR has a great story over at their site called After The Love Has Gone: Fans Spill On Ditching Their Favorite Artists;  it’s well worth reading.
I tend to think of musical taste as something that changes from time to time.  Bands you liked as a teenager are not likely to remain the bands you’re listening to in your 30s.  Nostalgia, though, is a powerful thing - the tractor beam gravity of those old friends will pull you back in every time, bathing you in the warm feelings of reminiscence.
I can think of 2 great examples from my life that come to mind in terms of feeling let down by an artist.  On the way home to Pittsburgh from seeing The Who perform Quadrophenia, the radio station announced that they were going to play the new post-Phil Collins Genesis single.  As my friend and I were both fans (although more into the Peter Gabriel years), we listened.  An atrocity called Congo went out over the air.  At its conclusion, my friend looked at me and said, "Uh-oh."  We really couldn’t say anything more. Genesis ended up cancelling the planned US tour for that Calling All Stations album due to poor sales.
The other was the band mentioned in the article: U2.  I saw them on the Joshua Tree and Zoo TV tours, and loved the reinvention they pulled off on the Achtung/Zooropa albums.  When Discotheque came out, though, it was far more jarring to me than even The Fly had been as a single.  Dubious about this new direction, I borrowed it first to listen, instead of taking my usual buy-it-immediately approach. 
"What did you think?" he innocently asked upon the disc’s return the next day.
"I’m glad I didn’t buy it; because if I had, it’d have to be thrown away.  This is so bad I don’t even want to trade it in, because then it’ll be inflicted on somebody else."  He winced.
U2 and I have met partway on some of the scattered tunes on the albums since then, which are generally on sale for relatively cheap.  They’ve not reached the highs of those two early ’90s albums again, though. Am eagerly looking forward to a deluxe Achtung Baby as the b-sides on the singles were rather interesting looks at the more experimental side of U2.
Got any good musical breakup stories?

NPR has a great story over at their site called After The Love Has Gone: Fans Spill On Ditching Their Favorite Artists;  it’s well worth reading.

I tend to think of musical taste as something that changes from time to time.  Bands you liked as a teenager are not likely to remain the bands you’re listening to in your 30s.  Nostalgia, though, is a powerful thing - the tractor beam gravity of those old friends will pull you back in every time, bathing you in the warm feelings of reminiscence.

I can think of 2 great examples from my life that come to mind in terms of feeling let down by an artist.  On the way home to Pittsburgh from seeing The Who perform Quadrophenia, the radio station announced that they were going to play the new post-Phil Collins Genesis single.  As my friend and I were both fans (although more into the Peter Gabriel years), we listened.  An atrocity called Congo went out over the air.  At its conclusion, my friend looked at me and said, "Uh-oh."  We really couldn’t say anything more. Genesis ended up cancelling the planned US tour for that Calling All Stations album due to poor sales.

The other was the band mentioned in the article: U2.  I saw them on the Joshua Tree and Zoo TV tours, and loved the reinvention they pulled off on the Achtung/Zooropa albums.  When Discotheque came out, though, it was far more jarring to me than even The Fly had been as a single.  Dubious about this new direction, I borrowed it first to listen, instead of taking my usual buy-it-immediately approach. 

"What did you think?" he innocently asked upon the disc’s return the next day.

"I’m glad I didn’t buy it; because if I had, it’d have to be thrown away.  This is so bad I don’t even want to trade it in, because then it’ll be inflicted on somebody else."  He winced.

U2 and I have met partway on some of the scattered tunes on the albums since then, which are generally on sale for relatively cheap.  They’ve not reached the highs of those two early ’90s albums again, though. Am eagerly looking forward to a deluxe Achtung Baby as the b-sides on the singles were rather interesting looks at the more experimental side of U2.

Got any good musical breakup stories?